SharePoint Customer/Job Timesheet Example

The blog post “SharePoint Task Plan – Tracking Time” discusses capturing time against a SharePoint Task Plan using SharePoint’s standard capabilities. This post presents an approach of capturing job hours at the Customer/Job level. It is based on Thuan’s post on The Soldier of Fortune blog titled “Building Timesheet Management Solution in Office 365 Without Code” but goes a couple of steps further.

We start by using the Customer List and from that setup a Customer/Job List as illustrated in the screen shot below:

 

The Job Customer field is a drop-down list from the Customer List. The Job Name field is added in by the user as is the Customer/Job Name. The screen shot does not show the Job City, Job State, Job Zip Code and Sale Person fields that are part of this list.

The Customer/Job field is needed for the Customer/Job Timesheet List below. You will also notice that I added Timesheet Activity as an optional field for billing and/or reporting purposes.

 

I combined Timesheet Year and Month for grouping as opposed to having them separately as in Thuan’s post. The formula being: =TEXT([Timesheet Date],”YYYY”)&”/”&TEXT([Timesheet Date],”MM”) . By establishing the Customer/Job Name field, it stops users from coming up with their own names and making time reporting unmanageable. See illustration below.

I also added views and grouping for Customer/Job/Date and Staff/Date/Customer/Job so you can see the hours and totals associated with those views. The screen shots in this post are using the New look for lists. Under the SharePoint Classic view, Total Hours are displayed by the selected group.

I then went ahead and generated a PowerApps cell phone application, so staff can enter the data when they are away from their computer. A screen shot of the PowerApps is below:

The PowerApps application above took about 5 minutes develop without any coding. See the post “QuickBooks Employee List PowerApps Example “ for more information on PowerApps.

A Customer Level Timesheet can be developed under the approach outlined above. The difference would be that a Customer/Job list would not be necessary, and the Job Name and Customer/Job Name fields would also not exist.

Project Task Plan Billing Using SharePoint

We setup a task plan for the Jim’s Family Store Irrigation Plan, discussed how we could post time against the project and view those timesheet charges. So let’s stay on the path on not yet posting to QuickBooks and discuss how we use SharePoint for billing the project. Below is a SharePoint Datasheet View of the project timesheet list. It contains the following columns:

  • Task:Title. These are tasks that so far received timesheet charges.
  • Timesheet Year Month. This column later allows summing the hours by month.
  • Timesheet Date. The dates the hours are charged against the task. In this illustration, I want to make the billing decisions by day and this is why task 2.0 “Determine irrigation requirements” is displayed on three rows of the view. I could have gotten more finite and also summarized by employee.
  • Timesheet Hours. The total hours charged on that date.
  • Non – Billable Work. These are hours that are not to be billed to Jim but incurred on the project (e.g. training time).
  • To Be Billed Work. Hours that are to be billed in March.
  • Not Yet Billed. Hours to be billed at a later date.
  • Project Rate. The rate associated with the task. This is for informational purposes.

The project/job manager completes the Non-Billable and To Be Billed columns of the datasheet to compute the actual billing. The Not Yet Billed column is a computed columns. This datasheet view is also exported and linked to Excel. The two pivot tables shown below the view are based on the export and show Actual Work to Budget and Actual Billed Amount to Budget. They are embedded in the billing view web page so the budget impact of the billing is available to the project manager as they enter the hours.

If the decision was not to develop the billing by date but rather by month, the Non-Billable, To Be Billed and Not Yet Billed columns would have been added to the Excel spreadsheet and not contained in the datasheet view. The pivot tables would still present the same data the project manager entered the hours.

Viewing Timesheet Charges

The post SharePoint Task Plan – Tracking Time presents a SharePoint List based timesheet for charging time against a project task plan. Adopting this type of list based timesheet raises the question: How does a project or job manager view all the time tracked to project? The screen shot below presents a view of the timesheet list displaying time charges by year/month and then task and employee. Summary totals are also presented. This view provides an easy way of seeing all time charged to the project. Alternative views would be by task, year/month, and employee or by employee, task, year/month etc. Because it is easy for users to develop their own personal views in SharePoint, a project or job manager can develop a view to meet their particular needs.

The number in parenthesis at the end of the task, indicates the number of entries for that task.  Heading columns, e.g. Task Title, Timesheet Date, Hours, Comments, Staff Member, etc. are not depicted in the screen shot.  They appear at the top of the view.

SharePoint Task Plan

The post Job/Prospect Setup Alternatives discusses the option of setting up a project task plan. SharePoint has great project management tools to assist team members in undertaking projects and communicating to customers of its progress.  So let’s look further at how this could work for the Jim’s Family Store Irrigation Plan project. We will assume that QuickBooks Sample Larry’s Landscape & Garden Supply company took advantage of SharePoint’s great functionality and put together both the proposal as discussed in Sales Proposals in SharePoint Online and a task plan as discussed in Task List Templates in Service Delivery. Larry’s has decided that for project management and customer relations reasons they want to manage and report against the plan.(Note: I could have set up the task plan as described in this post and submitted it as part of the proposal.)

Here is what they did to set it up:

  1. They added the Irrigation Design Tasks template to the Service Delivery subsite by choosing the template under Service Delivery subsite>Site Contents>Your Apps as shown below.

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  1. They set up a “Load Estimates” list as depicted below and copied and pasted the Project Rate, Estimated Work, and Estimated $ from the Excel spreadsheet in the Proposal Library to the list.

  1. This resulted in all tasks, hours, project rate, and estimated amounts being loaded into the task plan. Larry’s project manager then went in and edited the task plan for Task Start and End dates and assigned employees to the tasks as shown below. You may notice that I didn’t include Estimate $ and Project Rate in the view below since these amounts are fixed for this particular project and we can see them under other views of the task plan. I did include Estimated Work since this helpful in assigning employees to the project.

EditTask

We now have the completed task plan as depicted below. You will notice that the total hours and project start and end dates are at the top of the columns.

The standard Task Plan app in SharePoint also includes the following views:

  • Calendar View. Depicting the dates of the tasks.

  • Gantt View showing tasks and their relationships.

Additionally, list views are added by SharePoint for:

  • Completed Tasks
  • Upcoming Tasks
  • Late Tasks
  • My Tasks

The diamonds in the Gantt chart indicate one day tasks.  Project deliverables can be shown on the chart by giving them one day start and end dates.