SharePoint Customer/Job Timesheet Example

The blog post “SharePoint Task Plan – Tracking Time” discusses capturing time against a SharePoint Task Plan using SharePoint’s standard capabilities. This post presents an approach of capturing job hours at the Customer/Job level. It is based on Thuan’s post on The Soldier of Fortune blog titled “Building Timesheet Management Solution in Office 365 Without Code” but goes a couple of steps further.

We start by using the Customer List and from that setup a Customer/Job List as illustrated in the screen shot below:

 

The Job Customer field is a drop-down list from the Customer List. The Job Name field is added in by the user as is the Customer/Job Name. The screen shot does not show the Job City, Job State, Job Zip Code and Sale Person fields that are part of this list.

The Customer/Job field is needed for the Customer/Job Timesheet List below. You will also notice that I added Timesheet Activity as an optional field for billing and/or reporting purposes.

 

I combined Timesheet Year and Month for grouping as opposed to having them separately as in Thuan’s post. The formula being: =TEXT([Timesheet Date],”YYYY”)&”/”&TEXT([Timesheet Date],”MM”) . By establishing the Customer/Job Name field, it stops users from coming up with their own names and making time reporting unmanageable. See illustration below.

I also added views and grouping for Customer/Job/Date and Staff/Date/Customer/Job so you can see the hours and totals associated with those views. The screen shots in this post are using the New look for lists. Under the SharePoint Classic view, Total Hours are displayed by the selected group.

I then went ahead and generated a PowerApps cell phone application, so staff can enter the data when they are away from their computer. A screen shot of the PowerApps is below:

The PowerApps application above took about 5 minutes develop without any coding. See the post “QuickBooks Employee List PowerApps Example “ for more information on PowerApps.

A Customer Level Timesheet can be developed under the approach outlined above. The difference would be that a Customer/Job list would not be necessary, and the Job Name and Customer/Job Name fields would also not exist.

Task List Templates in Service Delivery

We will use the QuickBooks’ “Sample Larry’s Landscape & Garden Supply” to illustrate setting up a SharePoint Task template to ensure service delivery consistency and quality.  Using multiple posts, we will use this template from bidding through to job/project completion.

Let’s assume that Larry’s provides irrigation planning and installation services. The scope, elapsed time, and pricing for each project is going to vary due to differences in a client’s lot characteristics.  So Larry’s has set up a standard set of tasks using a SharePoint’s Task List for bidding and undertaking such projects.  This list is on the Larry’s SharePoint Service & Delivery subsite underneath the main site.

A screen shot of the 8 steps that make up the irrigation planning phase for such a project is shown below.  There are 4 columns:

  1. Task #
  2. Title
  3. Task Description
  4. Predecessor Tasks.

Irrig Task Overview

A screen shot of the subtasks underneath “1. Obtain Site Information” is below.

Irrigation Design Tasks Detail view

This is the standard irrigation task list that we will use in subsequent posts.